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DIY Acoustic Treatment: Gobo, part 4 March 20, 2009

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Project Studio, Studio Setup , 4comments

The final installation of the DIY gobo – the outer frame and base (more…)

DIY Acoustic Treatment: Gobo, part 3 March 20, 2009

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Filling it up!

(more…)

DIY Acoustic Treatment: Gobo, part 2 March 18, 2009

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The start of the gobo: the inner frame (more…)

DIY Acoustic Treatment: Gobo, part 1 March 18, 2009

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Project Studio, Studio Setup , 5comments

While planning for some recording projects this summer, I realized that a few gobos (mobile, often absorptive, sound isolation barriers) would really be of benefit.    However, I began searching online and found out I would have to spend more than $400 for each gobo… ouch.  I decided to build some myself. (more…)

DIY Acoustic Treatment: Introduction March 15, 2009

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Project Studio, Studio Setup , 2comments

Arguably the most important element of making awesome recordings has nothing to do with tubes, transistors, or electrons moving through copper.

Your room’s acoustics are extremely important!  Even the most expensive signal chain in the world can be greatly hampered if not used in a great sounding room.  Project and home studios can benefit greatly from even a small investment in treatment (such as absorption for first reflections and parallel surfaces plus bass trapping)

To make your acoustic dollars stretch even further (and to have a bunch of fun!), you can build the treatments yourself. (more…)

AOTD: 2/9/09 February 9, 2009

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, AOTD , add a comment

STC – Sound Transmission Coefficient

This is a number assigned to building materials to provide a means of comparing acoustical isolation properties.  The higher the number, the more isolation.  (For example, a CMU wall filled with sand would have a higher rating than a piece of drywall).  These numbers are important to acousticians when doing things like figuring out theoretical reverb time (RT60) calculations, among numerous other applications.

From Theory to Practicality – Comb Filtering November 22, 2008

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Digital Audio Workstations , 4comments

What is comb filtering?  What does comb filtering do to the audio?  What causes comb filtering?

^^These are all things that people involved in audio (from beginners to professionals) should know.  This article will discuss comb filtering from theory to practicality.  (Including a preview of a MAX program I’m working on that will do all the plotting and calculations for you…) (more…)

Keeping your ears happy and healthy? November 21, 2008

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Chit Chat, Project Studio , add a comment

How loud can you listen to music?

Working in an industry where it’s your job to listen to music all day, knowing the safe limits of our hearing system is really important.  You only get one set of ears, they need to last! (more…)

Human Hearing Physiology November 21, 2008

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, General Announcements , 1 comment so far

Ok, I know.

This academic stuff is a tough sell.

But!  As boring as this stuff can be, its really important.  I’m going to breakdown the complicated human hearing system into three parts to give you a basic understanding of what’s going on.  I’m writing this article as sort of a preface to some upcoming posts (about things like safe listening levels and how to protect your hearing).  Honestly, if you are working in audio, you should have a basic understanding of your own hearing system. (more…)

Battling a Large Body of Water: Part 2 August 12, 2008

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Microphone Techniques, Studio Setup , 2comments

Setting up mics on a drum kit in a converted basement is a bit of a nightmare (with of course the end result being that we want it to sound like we didn’t record it in a basement). Unfortunately, its a nightmare than many of us will go through at least once (if not many times) in our lifetime. (more…)

Home Studio Setup and Acoustics February 20, 2008

Posted by ConnorSmith in : Acoustics, Project Studio, Studio Setup , 4comments

Setting up the gear in your home studio can be really fun. But, what many forget is that the actual placement of gear in your room can have a huge impact as to how well your room “sounds”. When dealing with the parallel walls and small dimensions of a typical home or project studio, even following some basic guidelines in acoustics can make a huge sonic difference. Flutter echo, room modes, and improper speaker placement are all things to avoid.

These tips will help you minimize those issues, so you can get more accurate mixes from your room.

(more…)

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